Web Accessibility – Where to Start

Many businesses, when faced with the prospect of making their websites accessible do not know where to start. This post is intended to help with that.

The easiest place to start for most web site designers and administrators is with color contrast. Color contrast refers to the level of contrast the text on your site should have to its background.

There are two primary levels that you should be aware of the 3:1 contrast level for large text, and 4.5:1 contrast for small text. Large text is text that is 24 pixels in height or larger.

A common error is to presume that the 3:1 ratio is good enough for all text across your site. Unfortunately, it is not. Because smaller text is more challenging to read it requires a higher level of contrast to be legible. Small text and this generally includes your standard body text, needs to have a 4.5:1 contrast ratio. In addition, you should never use text, even fine print text on your site that is smaller than 10 pixels.

If you are in doubt whether or not your text should have the 3:1 or 4.5:1 ratio, err on the side of caution and just use the 4.5:1 ratio.

Determining Contrast

There are a number of tools that will check your contrast levels for you. Developers typically use a tool like Webaim’s wave checker to determine the contrast ratios on their site. This comes in a convenient chrome extension. In addition, you can use Webaim’s color contrast checking tool to try out individual colors and backgrounds.

Why is Text Contrast Important?

For a number of years it became somewhat fashionable in website designs to use very faint text, particularly in form fields and in footers. This low contrast text causes major problems for site users who have low visibility. You do want your site visitors to be able to read your content, right? That is why you put the content on your website, right? So give it enough contrast to be legible to the widest range of users possible.

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One thought on “Web Accessibility – Where to Start

  1. Pingback: Web Accessibility Basics – Focus Outline – Writing Rainbough

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